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coverage of the debate. fareed zakaria gdp is next for our viewers in the united states. >>> this is gps the global public square. welcome to awe of you around the united states and the world. i'm fareed zakaria. first up, kofi annan. the former secretary-general of the united nations and. i'll ask him whether there's any end in sight for that nation's brutal war, then the u.s. isn't the only major power picking a president for the next few weeks. i'll talk with beijing's reporter e van osnos. also i'll talk to the education innovator sal khan, the founder of khan academy about how best to teach our kids. >>> and what does a company with almost 700 planes and tens of thousands of trucks worry about? fuel. i'll sit down with fedex ceo fred smith to talk about the future of energy. that crucial subject, the future of energy is also at the heart of our latest gps special which airs tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. in global lessons, the roadmap for powering america will take you around the world to bring you ideas about energy back home. >>> but first here's my take. the
the united states economy. the price and economic impact would be much greater if these occurred. we hope that this paper which is a departure from the focus of most papers on the consequences of a nuclear iran or a nuclear capable iran will trigger a new discussion and enable an expanded debate on the topic. i would like to introduce michael, the foreign policy director of the bpc, a former oil analyst to boot. he directed this effort and will review some of the key findings. he will introduce our very distinguished panel. mike. >> thank you, senator. thank you everyone for coming. as the senator said, the purpose of this report is really to trigger a debate. we are not suggesting that we have all of the answers, but we wanted to introduce a new dimension to the debate about iran about preventing a nuclear iran. we are not -- focusing on the economics, we are not suggesting the economic issues should drive united states policy one way or another. but it has definitely come up in the debate. it has been raised, certainly in terms of let us say about the impact on sanctions and military, s
the united states. >> campbell is scheduled to meet with japanese officials to discuss bilateral cooperation on situations in east asia. >>> we interviewed a prominent british analyst on how he sees japan/china relations at the moment. professor michael clarke is director general at the royal united services institute for defense and security studies. >> for european, we understand the issue, i think, of the islands. we understand the delicacy of the issue. but it is a problem that can be similar disputes all around the world, and they will flare up from time to time. the most important thing from tokyo's point of view is not to allow too many precedents to be set on either side, which lock both powers, both beijing and tokyo, into positions from which they cannot retreat. we are modern powers in the world. there are many powers in the world which really are not modern. china is a great 20th century power. it's not really a 21st century power. and so those of us who are post-modern century societies, who live in very 21st century ways in the world, have got to share our ideas about the legit
hearing postponed. >> it in a stunning comeback over the united states, -- >> it in a stunning comeback over the united states, europe -- >> in a stunning comeback over the united states, europe clinched the ryder cup. >> georgia could be set for a post-election standoff. both the ruling party and opposition coalition are claiming victory. >> the former soviet republic has claimed that exit polls give the opposition an edge, but the government claims it will retain its majority. >> opposition supporters have taken to the streets to celebrate victory. georgians went to the polls against a backdrop of prison abuse, a scandal that has damaged the once-popular government of mikhail saakashvili. his name rivals -- his main rival was to move the country into russia. it is not clear when the outcome will be known. let's go live to our reporter following the ballot in georgia. some confusion about the outcome, with both major groups claiming victory. do you have any further details? >> these elections have been a close race from the beginning. what we now hear from tbilisi, is that these electi
the life of a united states ambassador, an american ambassador. this is serious stuff. americans deserve the truth on what happened. >> greta: so u.n. ambassador rice resign? earlier former secretary of defense donald rumsfeld went on the secretary. mr. secretary, nice to see you, sir. >> thank you. good to be with you. >> greta: there are many calls for ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, to resign. she has the backup of the secretary of state and the president, but there are calls for her to resign after going on all the talk shows and pushing this youtube video as the reason, the cause. your thoughts, sir? >> well, that's really up to the president and ambassador as far as i'm concerned. i think that the president can nominate who he wants, and the senate confirmed her. and she's the ambassador while she's there. i watched the presentation. and i thought it was amazing that someone in her position would go on with that degree of certainty, that fast, and that authoritiatively and be that wrong. >> greta: do you think she was perhaps hung out to dry? i thought it was unusual that the a
to iran in terms of views of the united states. so there's a very different dynamic on the ground among libyan youth. notwithstanding what we're seeing in the news. um, and i thought the uprising in benghazi was hugely a success, important to think about when 30,000 people rose up a few weekends ago to throw out islamist militias. the population once again taking control of the situation where a dysfunctional government wasn't able to. and i found the intervention very interesting because in many ways i think the main bogeyman was not the islamist militias, but the fear of what the 30,000 would do if things got much worse. which brings up another thing that i should have said in the introductory remarks, the arab spring, the dynamic, we view it as people against regimes, but just as important is regimes against regimes and people against people, and i'm happy to talk about those in the q&a, but it's not just people against regimes. following benghazi, a well known libyan academic said something which stuck with me. he said libyans have no idea where they're going, but they're going to g
is inconceivable that the president of the united states was unaware of the facts that were obvious to the intelligence community. how could he have not known and if he didn't know, who kept that information from him? >> governor, that is the duty of inquiry. you ran a government. you understand and i think particularly where there is notice and now you should be getting real time reports from that -- that give accurate and actual information. this is the same paradigm we are seeing i fast and furious e the response is well, we didn't know anything about it. and you can't be able to be held unaccountable because you choose not to listen to those who have information to bring to you. and i'm being kind when i say choose not to listen. i think there is a duty of inquire arery. there is a duty of responsibility when something that significant that had to be one of the most important things the federal government was is responding to at that moment and for them to say that they aren't aware of the circumstances suggests one of two things. either incompetentence or are misrepresentation
military budget. we have to standby our allies. the tension between israel and the united states was very unfortunate. i think that pulling our missile defense program out of poland and the way we did was also unfortunate in terms of, if you will, disrupting the relationship in some ways that existed between us. then with regards for standing for our principle, when the students took to the streets in tehran and the people protested, the green revolution occurred for the president to be silent i thought was an enormous mistake. we have to stand for our principles and our allies and for a strong military and a stronger economy. >> mr. president? >> america remains the one indispensable nation. it is stronger now than when i came into office. because we entered the war in iraq, we were able to refocus our attention on not only the terrorist threat, but also beginning a transition process in afghanistan. it also allowed us to refocus on alliances and relationships that had been neglected for a decade. and governor romney, our alliances have never been stronger. in asia, in europe, in africa,
that if the republicans take over control of the united states senate, they have made it clear that in order to pay for the tax cuts for the richest americans, they will make cuts elsewhere. what is the only proposal on the table? more than half a trillion dollars in cuts in education, basic infrastructure, and research. to have a good, federal partner in washington, we have to make funding education a priority. >> this question goes to elizabeth warren. can you tell us where you would look first and last? can you identify two federal programs that can be cut, and two he would work hard to protect? >> you are exactly right. we will have to take a balanced approach. i would be clear in terms of cutting the agricultural subsidy programs. it is time to cut in our military budget. we are winding out of one war. we can realign our priorities. on the other hand, i want to make clear i will not go to washington to cut medicare or social security benefits. [applause] when we talk about a balanced approach, we need to be talking about spending cuts and we need to be talking about increasing revenues. it tak
of the united states, alan, i would order the secretary of the treasury to immediately buy up the bad home loan mortgages in america and renegotiate at the new value of those homes, at the diminished value of those homes and let people be able to make those payments and stay in their homes. is it expensive? yes. but we all know, my friends, until we stabilize home values in america, we're never going to start turning around and creating jobs and fixing our economy. and we've got to give some trust and confidence back to america. i know how the do that, my friends. and it's my proposal. it's not senator obama's proposal, it's not president bush's proposal. but i know how to get america working again, restore our economy and take care of working americans. thank you. >> senator, we have one minute for a discussion here. obviously, the powers of the treasury secretary have been greatly expanded. the most powerful officer in the cabinet now. hank paulson says he won't stay on. who do you have in mind to appoint to that very important post? senator mccain? >> not you, tom. >> no, with good reason. >
attack in the united states last year. talk about credibility. when this administration says all options are on the table, they send all these mixed signals. in order to solve this peacefully, you have to have the ayatollahs change their minds. look at where they are. it is because this administration has no credibility on this issue. this administration watered down sanctions. now we have been in place because of congress. the military option is not being viewed as credible. make sure we have credibility. under a romney administration, we will have credibility. >> incredible. do you think there is any possibility the entire world would have joined us? russia and china? these are the most crippling sanctions in the history of sanctions. period. when the governor is asked about it, he said, we have to keep the sanctions. you're going to go to war? the interesting thing, how are they going to prevent war? saye is nothing more they'd we should do than what we have already done. with regard to the ability of the united states to take action militarily, it is not in my purview to talk about c
manufacturer in the world. it used to be the united states of america. >> governor, you're the last person who will get tough on china. >> we have iran four years closer to a nuclear bomb. >> when folks go after americans, we go after them. campaign 2012, a presidential debate. from boca raton, florida, here is scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, it was 50 years ago tonight that president john f. kennedy went on national television to announce that the soviet union had set up missile sites in cuba and he demanded that they be removed. the world was on the brink of nuclear war. it is a reminder of the kind of crisis a commander-in-chief can face. and it comes as as the candidates for president hold their final debate tonight, focusing on foreign policy. with the race still very tight, both president obama and mitt romney have a lot to gain and a lot to lose in their final joint appearance before a national audience. it might be their last best chance to win over the uncommitted voters who will decide the election, which is now just two weeks away. for tonight's debate, the candidates will be
. it was a dangerous showdown that gripped the united states 50 years ago. it was october 28, 1962 when the cuban missile crisis threatened to turn the cold war into a hot one. the bbc has gained exclusive access to new information that shows there was the second stage to the crisis. >> the cuban missile crisis did not end on october 28, 1962. cuba was going to become a nuclear power right under the nose of the united states, 90 miles from florida. >> there was a lot of attention for at least another three weeks and until that moment, we were at the highest state of alert short of nuclear war. >> i call upon chairman khrushchev. he has the opportunity to world the world back from the abyss of destruction. >> people around the world. the sigh of relief in october 1962 when soviet president nikita khrushchev agreed to remove nuclear weapons from cuba. but in a total failure of intelligence, the u.s. was blind to the existence of tactical nuclear weapons. meanwhile, negotiations -- castro began to see some cooperation with the soviets. >> castro is very angry at the soviet the trail. it sounds like
. >> the united states military has begun strikes. >> reporter: at first -- >> one, two, three -- >> reporter: the -- the war had momentum. and a clear purpose. al qaeda with bases in afghanistan attacked the united states on 9/11. just three months later, the u.s. drove the taliban from power. al qaeda and osama bin laden were on the run. it was done with a few hundred cia officers, special forces, and air power. a quick victory. but not decisive. and then came the distraction of a new war, in iraq. the taliban regrouped, and the u.s. began a nation-building project that has been far less successful. the government washington helped put in place is widely considered corrupt. president karzai is supposed to be out by 2015. but afghans don't believe it. the war has brought some benefits to afghans. 3 million girls now go to school. that was banned under the taliban. better health care and new clinics have boosted life expectancies by as much as 22 years. but those gains could temporary. if the villagers in shakar dhara are right and the afghan government can't hold the country together, the ta
of the united states in the arab world, he will -- whoever will win will have to face a totally different wornd world. that policy is different today. you have to face government that were elected and are in power and they don't have to have the same interests. he have to convince them and collaborate and partner with them on shaping their realities closest we can to our views. i'm sorry to say that. president obama will come with his achievements, killing bin laden, hammering al qaeda, actually trying to endorse palestinian and israeli peace process that he couldn't do because of the factors of what's going on on the ground and many other things. what romney will come with is a bunch of insults towards these countries that alienate them before he's in office. even with china. how can he talk to the number two economy in the world, the number one holder of u.s. debt and the country giving loans to emerging markets more than the world bank. how can he talk to them before you're in office in those terms? how do you think they will do? >> a really good point. in the mideast we're dealing with demo
camps inside the united states landed in the u.s. on saturday after a very lengthy legal battle against extradition. the nobel prize in physics has been awarded to scientists have invented different ways to measure and to study quantum particles. it was carried out by a french and american scientists. findings can open the way the superfast computers an incredibly precise clocks. authorities say that the body of one of the country's most brutal drug lords has been snatched from a funeral parlor. it was confirmed that the man that went by the alias the executioner had been killed in a gunfight with marines. >> news from the mexican government's point of view was mixed. they were brought down in a shootout, and after initial doubts, they confirmed that it was definitely the of the drug kingpin of the most wanted men in mexico. >> of the protocols of unidentified bodies, they carried out a comparative analysis of the bodies. the result was confirmed for those of the national fingerprint database. >> what followed was cause for real dismay among the local authorities. the body was snatched
. as president of the united states, that diplomat core works for him. and he nominates those ambassadors. so what we need to do when the united states has been attacked, when the americans have been killed while serving our country, we don't need to have mitt romney and the republicans in congress taking their first instinct, being to take cheap political shots -- >> hold on a minute, because it was not about what mitt romney which was clumsy in its own way, but the suggestion that ambassador rice made statements that were blaming -- this video -- >> piers. >> it must have been known after four or five days that it was much more likely to have been a terrorist attack that it would have been planned. >> piers, i can't even believe you would suggest that ambassador rice would make misleading statements. at the beginning of this, it was very unclear as to what happened. the main thing was rather than make snap judgments that we take a step back, make sure a full investigation was done. >> let me rephrase it. do you accept that ambassador rice was simply wrong? >> well, i think has more informat
we don't want do have it." officials claim that the united states is not directly arming rebel fighters but the c.i.a. has reportedly sent officers to turkey in an effort to help funnel the weapons. now jennifer is at the pentagon this afternoon. this is not the first time we have concerned over jihadists in syria getting weapons. >>reporter: in fact the state department has been warning about this from the beginning. it is the qatar and saudis that were providing the weapons to the syrian opposition. >> i will just say that we have been tracking this all along. we have been discussing our concerns about extremists high, jag the operations of the syrian people. we have urged careful vetting all those things and we will continue to do so. >>reporter: another senior official said it is not exactly easy to determine whether all of this lethal material goes, which explains why the united states is toll roading carefully. some aid falls in the wrong saids and in syria the right hands today can be the wrong hands the next day. the israels have not requested that the united states be
. the global action has resulted in the toughest economic penalties in three decades on iran. the united states has targeted many of the firms including the national iranian oil companies, one of the largest crude exporters in the world. iran citizens are feeling the pain firsthand with prices at the market skyrocketing for items like meat and pruett and a local says that whatever you buy today gets more expensive tomorrow. now, a former d.e.a. liaison to the secret service, who is the founder and c.e.o. of global securities group incorporated, a risk management and counterterrorism consulting company. nice to see you, david. i searched the history books for a time when sanctions work and the books are absent on that matter. >>guest: the sanctions make the people miserable but they will not persuade ahmadinejad immediate and the rules class. the other thing, there are ways they can circumvent the sanctions. traditionally, when they have needed to raise currency, harsh, they fall back on what they have 15 for decades, the drug trade, counterfeiting, criminal activity. they use their hezbollah to
, if the world, if the united states would just give -- would create a no-fly zone or allow the rebels to have rockets, he said that the war here that's claimed so many lives and killed so -- and caused so many people to be on the run, would end in two days, andrea? >> and ann, one of the people -- one of the refugees whom you spoke to, was a displaced woman named hoda. talk to me about her. it was a commelling interview -- compelling interview. >> she's one of about a million people who are basically living on the run inside syria, about half of them according to the united nations children, and she's living in a tent. she had just arrived that day. she arrived because her son was hurt in an aerial strike. he was wounded on his head and also in his leg. he had gotten some hospital care, but he was recovering in this tent and she was very upset. she was crying and saying, you know, essentially to the pilot of the plane, do you not have children? you know, and to president bashar assad, do you not -- do you want to see your children suffering in the way that is -- my son is suffering. she was v
israel and the united states was very unfortunate. i think also that pulling our missile defense program out of poland and the way we did, was also unfortunate in terms of, if you will, disrupting the relationship in some ways that existed between us. and then, of course, with regards to standing or for our principles, when the students took to the streets in tehran people protested, the green revolution occurred. for the president to be silent, i thought, was an enormous mistake. we have to stand for our principles, stand for our allies, strand for strong military, and stand for a stronger economy. >> mr. president? >> america remains the one indispensable nation, and the world needs a strong america. and it is stronger now than when i came into office. because we ended the war in iraq, we were able to refocus our attention on not only the terrorist threat but also beginning a transition process in afghanistan. it also allowed us to refocus on alliances and relationships that had been neglected for a decade. and, governor romney, our alliances have never been stronger. in asia, in europ
're a president of the united states. in every position that he has ever held in the governor and now as a candidate he's flipped positions on any issue he's ever had to deal with. >> not any. >> wait. come on. >> during the republican debates, his opponents kept saying, wait a minute, when you were governor of massachusetts you were for gay marriage, pro-abortion rights. he says i changed since then. so he changed during the republican time and now he's changing back. >> toto, we're not in kansas anymore. mitt, we're not in the republican primary anymore. we're not running for a faction of the republican party. we're running to be government -- to lead the government of the entire united states. >> so say whatever he wants as long as he gets elected. >> i don't know where the moral high ground is for president obama on this. remember the guy who wasn't going to take money from super pacs? >> absolutely. good point. another one. you've noted too, those are both right and evolution on gay marriage is ridiculous. but that's not a flip. he tried to guantanamo bay. so did bush and mccain.
in the united states and create jobs. >> i can tell you from my own experiences as a governor in a competitive state that our best teachers were that labor unions. then later on, and george soros. he taught everyone in america. you cannot afford to sit on the sidelines. go for it, i say. >> we do not do endorsements. we have pacs. we encourage them to be involved. if we are going to address any of these issues, maybe we can get something done if everything looks exactly the same. it is an example of people having a better understanding of our position. that is why been we have engage our membership on it. >> let's go to questions from the audience. please raise your hand and give me your name and your affiliation. and that would be wonderful. there are microphones. the lady with the red jacket. >> good morning. i am the ceo of women's and structural owners association in alexandria. there has been a lot of discussion about the size of government and how do we get the money that we need. what about the discussion of cutting the size of government? it is too big. in any downturn, all the busines
need to focus on getting our society back together and being the united states of america. people fear to mess with us. it seems to me we are getting weaker and weaker. our military. i am for the republicans and i am for mr. romney. that is what i have to say. >> they give for the call. two 19th century presidents graduated from the college in kentucky. this is the second time the college has hosted a vice presidential debate. the first was in 2000. back again for tonight's first and only vice-presidential debate. available on our web site, c- span.org. following the debate, the media's room providing his own spin on the vice-president's performance. caller: a clash between fact and conviction. i heard the congressman say at the end of his speech they will follow through. [indiscernible] we did not get an answer on the tax plan. the one thing he ran away from, the $2 billion comment that govern the romney made, the defense spending. he could not explain their medicare plan. he tried to run away from the fact on senior citizens over time. he criticized the stimulus plan, the recovery ac
-president of the united states. but did he win the debate? good morning, everyone. the media is pushing the biden victory line. ryan on the defensive, ryan the bystander says "the washington post." will it last? america watched the vice-president interrupt frequently, smirk far too much and just get the facts plain wrong. and paul ryan went right at the obama record and the issues, taxes in particular. and he won the warned the middle class, watch out, this president will take more of you. you'll see it on the program and astonished at this. the european union wins the nobel peace prize, yes, collapsing rioting europe wins for peace, incredible. "varney & company" is about to begin. >> ryan focussed on the issues and biden focusing on attacking and interrupting. you could argue either man won. one of the big moments when they were talking about taxes and listen to this exchange. >> the only way you can find 5 trillion dollars in loopholes is cut the mortgage deduction for middle class people, cut the health care deduction, middle class people, take away their ability to get a tax break to send their kid
of the united states particularly in light of the fact there were two attacks on april and june. one was an ied that blew a hole in the wall. there was attempted assassination of the british ambassador in benghazi. the question is what did the president know, what did he know about it and what did he do about it? that is the what the president of the united states responsibility is. >> reporter: by the way in the a separate interview secretary clinton deflect ad question about her own aspirations for a presidential run in 2016. gin that. jenna: we'll talk more about this developing story in the next several hours. jails, thank you very much. >> reporter: thank you. jon: right now a major announcement about social security benefits. fed says millions will see increase in their monthly payments but it might not be the kind of number you expect. steve centanni following the story from washington. >> reporter: hi, jon. 56 americans receiving social security will see their checks go up but only 1.7% next year. this is tied to the rate of inflation just released this morning by the bureau of labor st
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 381 (some duplicates have been removed)